Pretend We're Dead: Capitalist Monsters in American Pop Culture

By Annalee Newitz

In Pretend We’re Dead, Annalee Newitz argues that the slimy zombies and gore-soaked murderers who've stormed via American movie and literature over the last century include the violent contradictions of capitalism. Ravaged via overwork, alienated through company conformity, and mutilated by means of the unfettered lust for revenue, fictional monsters act out the issues with an economy that turns out designed to devour humans whole.

Newitz appears to be like at representations of serial killers, mad medical professionals, the undead, cyborgs, and unfortunates mutated by means of their involvement with the mass media undefined. even if contemplating the serial killer who turns homicide right into a type of hard work by means of mass generating useless our bodies, or the hack writers and bloodthirsty actresses trapped inside of Hollywood’s profit-mad storytelling computer, she finds that every creature has its personal story to inform approximately how a freewheeling marketplace financial system turns humans into monstrosities.

Newitz tracks the monsters spawned through capitalism via b video clips, Hollywood blockbusters, pulp fiction, and American literary classics, their manifestations in works reminiscent of Norman Mailer’s “true lifestyles novel” The Executioner’s Song; the fast tales of Isaac Asimov and H. P. Lovecraft; the cyberpunk novels of William Gibson and Marge Piercy; true-crime books concerning the serial killers Ted Bundy and Jeffrey Dahmer; and films together with Modern Times (1936), Donovan’s Brain (1953), Night of the residing Dead (1968), RoboCop (1987), The Silence of the Lambs (1991), and Artificial Intelligence: AI (2001). Newitz exhibits that as literature and picture inform it, the tale of yank capitalism because the overdue 19th century is a story of body-mangling, soul-crushing horror.

Show description

Quick preview of Pretend We're Dead: Capitalist Monsters in American Pop Culture PDF

Best Capitalism books

The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism: and Other Writings (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics)

Within the Protestant Ethic, Max Weber opposes the Marxist suggestion of dialectical materialism and relates the increase of the capitalist economic climate to the Calvinist trust within the ethical worth of labor and the success of one's worldly tasks.

Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism

"What i'm looking here's a greater knowing of the contradictions of capital, no longer of capitalism. i would like to grasp how the industrial engine of capitalism works how it does, and why it will possibly stutter and stall and occasionally seem to be at the brink. I additionally are looking to express why this monetary engine could be changed, and with what.

A Brief History of Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism--the doctrine that marketplace trade is an ethic in itself, in a position to appearing as a advisor for all human action--has turn into dominant in either inspiration and perform all through a lot of the realm when you consider that 1970 or so. Writing for a large viewers, David Harvey, writer of the hot Imperialism and The situation of Postmodernity, right here tells the political-economic tale of the place neoliberalization got here from and the way it proliferated at the international level.

The Production of Difference: Race and the Management of Labor in U.S. History

In 1907, pioneering hard work historian and economist John Commons argued that U. S. administration had proven only one "symptom of originality," particularly "playing one race opposed to the opposite. " during this eye-opening ebook, David Roediger and Elizabeth Esch provide a notably new manner of knowing the historical past of administration within the usa, putting race, migration, and empire on the middle of what has occasionally been narrowly noticeable as a look for potency and economic system.

Extra info for Pretend We're Dead: Capitalist Monsters in American Pop Culture

Show sample text content

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.40 of 5 – based on 50 votes